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Energy Assessors in demand as deadline approaches

02 July 2008

Low Carbon Energy Assessors are reporting high volumes of workload for energy certificates, as demand increases ahead of the 1st October deadline and as those affected rush to get their certificates.

Since the legislation came into force earlier this year, CIBSE Certification has accredited over two thirds of all the energy assessors and CIBSE Low Carbon Energy Assessors (LCEAs) form an elite group of the most competent professionals, trained and accredited to produce Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) and Display Energy Certificates (DECs). It is estimated that 40,000 buildings will require a DEC by October and that a further 10,000 EPCs will be required every month from October.

Prospective clients are turning first to the CIBSE Certification website to find energy assessment service providers, mainly because the widest choice of energy assessors can be accessed via CIBSE Certification and there is also a growing recognition of the high degree of competence of LCEAs.

Accredited LCEA Judy Ong, of Ecotag, explained: “The rush to get DECs in time for October is definitely in full swing. There is never an enquiry for just one DEC, there is always at least a dozen and sometimes a few hundred required.

We would encourage anyone who thinks they will require DECs not to delay in finding an assessor, in order to get assessments completed in good time.”

LCEA Richard Hipkiss, of i-Prophets Energy Services, added: “With 1st October nearing, the volumes of certificates LCEAs are working on is increasing by the week. For DECs in particular occupiers are starting to realise that now is the time to start, and companies like ours with consultancy and project management experience are geared up to meet the volumes.”

From 1st July: those buildings with a total useful floor area greater than 2,500 m² now require EPCs on construction, sale or let.
From 1st October: All remaining buildings will require EPCs on construction, sale or let and all public buildings over 1,000m² will require a DEC.


For further information please visit www.cibsecertification.co.uk


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